Indra Nooyi — CEO and President of Pepsi

Here is a nice blog entry from Capitalist Chicks about Indra Nooyi.   Indra also said some nice things about employee appreciation and talent management.  Also, her story is a very interesting one about how a girl from India rose to become today’s most powerful business women in the US.  Please read it and be inspired :).

http://www.capitalistchicks.com/?q=node/120

Another nice article too:

http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/2006-nooyi.php

Pano Logic’s Virtual Desktop — Do you Buy the Pitch?

Here’s the link:  http://www.panologic.com/who-we-are/resources.php

Well, I’ve always something like this would be cool, but I don’t buy all the claims of no maintenance, no software, no CPU (GPU or memory), and rock solid security.  I’m sorry, but there is some basic hardward and coding needed to process images, handle peripherial input, and to shuffle data back and forth between the client and the server.  I’ve seen the way my weakest computer sputters when it has downloaded an application intensive webpage.  There’s a lot of operations going on inside a computer, so it seems to me that you would need a pretty FAT Internet pipe in order to handle the data in this virtual computing environment.  As for the security, well, fundamentally it makes no sense to me because the server can always be attacked.  It sounds to me, that anyone with a credential could go and cause problems.  Anyhow, I don’t know much about these things, but, this just doesn’t sound right.

Are there any experts out there who could explain how this would all work (in English please — I don’t understand network/CS speak)?  If this were seriously the case, then all video games could be played through virtualization and keeping up with the latest hardware would be out of the hands of the gamer.  In this way gaming would become a pure service like cable and it could be easily integrated into any entertainment device.

 

Movie Review: "Shoot 'Em Up"

If the title doesn’t already spark interest, then this movie is not for you.  To sum it up this is a movie about a very angry man who really likes carrots, an infant, a lactating prostitute, and a smarty-pants bad guy who spouts really bad one-liners and seems to have an infinite number of henchman who can’t fire straight.  “Shoot ‘Em Up” feels more like we are watching someone play a first person shooter from a third person perspective.  The plot is a throw away mcguffin — an excuse to see this angry man in action.  The action is great!  The guns are like hand cannons and the action scenarios they come up with are ingenious — sorta like an adult version of “Home Alone.”  The weird thing, though, is at its heart this is an anti-gun movie.  Go figure ???  For the most part I was comfortable with violence because it really seems cartoony (helped by the overall CG effect that makes everything look gritty and contrasty).  Toward the end, though, there is a torture scene that doesn’t involve guns that really bothered me.  All in all, this a film that so incredibly bad that it’s incredibly good.  Still, I want to stress that if the title doesn’t spark interest for you, then don’t see this movie.  For those who think “Shoot ‘Em Up” sounds like the thing to see, then go.  You will be pleasantly surprised and most likely leave the theater with a big smile plastered across your face.  I was definitely smiling.

“3:10 to Yuma” next week as my Saturday night was highjacked by parents who lured us with free steak dinners — SWEET.  We’re still enjoying the leftovers.

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Other thoughts on the movie: 

1.  Big gaming influence was felt will watching this.  There were clear scenes of gameplay interlaced with cut-scenes in which the talking took place.  The “player” also looted the fallen for guns and ammo, just like a video game.

2.  The studio set about generating buzz for this movie at Comic Con.  To get funding, the movie producer/director (somebody) drew 15-mins of animation to show the action involved — to heck with the story.  Like movies before it, the making-off film was used on TV and the internet to generate buzz.  It also used its “not a studio” film cache to try to appeal to the nerdy Comic Con types.  This felt vary much like last year’s “300” advertising campaign were the buzz was so great that people had also declared this the best film of the year before they even saw it.  (BTW: This isn’t the best film of the year in my opinion.)

3.  In movie advertising?  As some of you may know, Clive Owen is the driver from Guy Ritchie’s BMW films, a series of short films that were all around the Internet a little while back.  The car chase scenes featured BMW too, so I wonder if this was intentional advertisement paid for by BMW, an homage to the BMW films, or pure coincidence.